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Potential for Evaporation Energy to Become Main U.S. Power Source

Caption: Natural evaporation of Russian river (Source: Flickr)





Potential for Evaporation Energy to Become Main U.S. Power Source Ryan Kilgallon ’21   According to research conducted at Columbia University, renewable evaporation energy has the potential to create 325 gigawatts of power, nearly 70 percent of the country’s current power production, using lakes and reservoirs throughout the United States. […]

Astronomers Identify Rare Comet-like Binary Asteroid

This artwork shows the orbital path for each of binary asteroid 288P’s component asteroids. The shaded white area represents the sublimation of water, a comet-like characteristic.
Image Source: Wikipedia Commons





Astronomers Identify Rare Comet-like Binary Asteroid Aadil Islam ‘21 Spotting a shooting star in the sky is an infrequent spectacle in itself, yet a German-led group of astronomers appears to have doubled their fortune this past year. In September of 2016, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope was used to spot 288P, […]

Cassiopea jellyfish prove that sleep requires no brain

Cassiopea xamachana, a species belonging to the Cassiopea genus, is a primitive jellyfish with no brain that raises questions about the physiological origins of sleep. Source: Wikimedia Commons.





Cassiopea jellyfish prove that sleep requires no brain By Armando Ortiz ’19 The mechanisms of sleep and its effects on the nervous system continue to baffle scientists with many unanswered questions surrounding this topic. One recent study on primitive jellyfish further adds to scientists’ questions about the origin of sleep […]

Ancient DNA Explains Human Origins and Prehistory

Source: Wikimedia Commons 
Caption: Researchers at Harvard Medical School recently sequenced DNA samples from 15 humans from Sub-Saharan Africa to reconstruct the distribution and diversification of humans across the African continent between 1,000-8,000 years ago.





Ancient DNA Explains Human Origins and Prehistory By Bradley Fox, ‘21 Genetic information from fifteen different Ancient African individuals living between 1,000 and 8,000 years ago has given modern researchers key information on the migration patterns of ancient humans (1, 2). A recent study, released in the journal Cell on […]

Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves

A picture of the poison frog, Epipedobates anthonyi, seen in Germany (Source: Wikimedia Commons, by H. Krisp).





Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves By Amanda Jiang ’21 Summary: Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have recently discovered how the specific epibatidine toxin receptor interacts with epibatidine through studying its presence in Epipedobates anthonyi frogs. The epibatidine receptor has been found to be in the same […]

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